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Migrating Thoughts…..

Migrating Thoughts…..

We have Yellow Fin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares) visit our waters by the second week of March almost every year and can be found quite close to land for the next few months. Catch statistics show they are in our waters in the highest concentrations in the month of June. They are a pelagic species, which means they mostly live in the open ocean and do not live near the sea floor, although they may spend part of their life cycle in comparatively shallower waters close to the coastline. Yellow Fin Tuna can be found in most places along the Equator and just extend roughly to 40°N and to roughly 35°S. They can survive in seas within the temperature range of 10°C-33°C. They prefer warmer clean water and areas of low turbidity. They can be most commonly found near and around marine habitats such as drop-offs and the continental shelf. Yellow Fin tuna have often been found with schools of different species of Dolphins and other big fish. They are an oceanic species occurring above and below thermocline. They school primarily by size, either in mono-specific or multispecies groups both of which we have commonly seen here in the Andaman Islands. Yellow Fin Tuna travel great distances. Migratory patterns have shown distances traveled from the Western US Coast all the way to Japan. They are pelagic fish found from 1-250m deep. They can be found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas with the exception of the Mediterranean Sea. They are known migrate on a regular basis, on time scales ranging from daily to annually or longer, and over distances ranging...
Richard and Roy’s crazy Andaman GT Adventure!

Richard and Roy’s crazy Andaman GT Adventure!

Earlier this year Richard Larter and Roy Stace walked through our front door. They were the first foreign angling clients we’d had who walked in with a tan! They were on a long trip through S. E. Asia which they ended with a week of fishing in the Andaman Islands. They’d fished in many a fishy location before for various commonly sought after tropical fish but this was their first full blown GT popping trip. Armed with a bunch of popping rods and a bag full of poppers and stick-baits from Orion Lures in France they seemed pretty ready for the task at hand. After setting up their tackle and an initial briefing about the fishing explaining how hard GT hit surface lures and the absolute necessity to strike hard and send those hooks home they went off for day of sightseeing in and around Port Blair. Richard casting at a very fishy spot. We fish this corner of blue water that drops from 5 to 50 meters in a flash and has a healthy population of GT patrolling the margins. We keep the boat well off the reef and cast in to the shallows. Big GT come up and smash poppers as they’re fished off the edges of the reef. Richard was soon rewarded as his Cono Cono 150 was smashed by this nice fish that almost pulled him off the boat. As you can see he’s mighty happy with his accomplishment. The prefect specimen waxs released after a quick photograph and we hope to cross paths with it again. Roy with a small GT that came up...